Why you should read 100 books

When I was fresh out of college with a internship at E Ink (maker’s of the display screen for the Amazon Kindle) I emailed the founder and then CEO, Russ Wilcox, to see if he would meet with me to give me some advice on entrepreneurship. Lucky for me, he was willing to schedule a meeting before my internship ended. You can read the full story here, but one of the best pieces of advice he gave me during our meeting was simple, yet powerful: Read 100 Books.

At the time it almost didn’t make sense and led to more questions than answers. What books? Why that many? How fast? By when?

I remember frantically writing down a bunch of book titles he started mentioning and then he stopped me and said the important thing was that they were on a diverse set of topics with different viewpoints instead of any specific books. He suggested trying to read 5-10 on categories like sales, marketing, leadership, negotiation, etc.

Mission Accomplished.

5 Years and 4 months after that conversation, I’ve finally hit the number and now looking back, I realize it’s one of the most important pieces of advice I ever received. I would not be where I am today if I hadn’t read as much as I have. Reading 100 books has done all the following for me:

  • Helped me better understand the responsibilities of coworkers (especially important as a product manager and startup founder).
  • Being comfortable in a conversation on just about any subject due to what I’ve read.
  • Rapidly improved my skills in key work responsibilities helping me accelerate my career and avoid costly mistakes.
  • Met other great people who also read regularly.
  • Given me the confidence and framework to help me learn anything.

If you’re reading this, I encourage you to also read 100 books. But realize it’s not about the number, but a routine of reading regularly that will serve you well throughout life.

Here’s my quick advice on how to make it happen and make the most of it:

1) Read what you can apply immediately.

I’ve managed to read a wide variety of books that have helped in my career and I’ve always chosen books based on what my current challenges and interests are. This has helped me apply concepts I pick up as I read a book, usually over the span of 2-4 weeks, depending on the length.

When I was moving to SF to run product at KISSmetrics, I started out with a great book on Product Management, then dove into a few books on design, before finding myself diving into sales, marketing, leadership and strategy books depending on what was happening at work and my personal life. Every time, I found great ways to build on what I read in my life around me which has helped tremendously with retention and understanding.

2) Get good recommendations.

Not all books are created equal. In fact, most books are pretty terrible, especially business books. There are gems out there though, so it really pays off to ask others who read what the *best* books are they’ve read on a subject. This has saved me tons of time on books that aren’t worth my time. This is why I made a list reviewing of all the books I’ve read  and some of my all time favorite books for entrepreneurs here. You’ll also occasionally find posts about books that CEOs like Jeff Bezos has his leaders read, which are usually great.

3) Build a routine of reading.

I read on public transportation. First it was riding the T in Boston and now MUNI around SF. I love this for so many reasons:

  • It gives you something to look forward to even when a bus commute might be lengthy.
  • A book won’t get stolen like your cell phone might be when you have it out as you play Angry Birds/check Facebook, etc.
  • It gives you bite size chunks of reading as most rides are 10-30 minutes…just enough for a chapter or two.
  • A book is a great way to get just a little bit more personal space on a crowded bus.
  • It’s a great warm up and cool down to your work day if you read during your commute.

If that’s not an option for you, build a routine around it in some other way. Maybe it’s 20 minutes before you go to bed, while you eat breakfast or perhaps audio books while you drive to work. It is the routine of always reading something that will carry you through that many books over the years.

4) Carry your book around with you.

Nothing sparks a conversation like someone noticing what you’re reading. Often those that notice read a lot too, which is a great way to make friends and you can get more recommendations for books from them. This also means that if a friend is running late, you always have a productive way to fill the time.  I brought Dale Carnegie’s “How to Win Friends and Influence People” with me to Bootstrap Live and ended up talking with Andrew Warner and the guy next to me about how much we all loved it.

5) Write all over your books.

Despite working in technology, I still prefer physical books in my hand. I underline, I highlight and dog ear all my books. Something about it helps me with retention of what I read. Even if you prefer to read on a tablet or Kindle, be sure to take notes and challenge yourself to think about how to apply what you’re reading. It helps a lot to review books you’ve read before when you have that subject come up. It’s amazing to me how often past events line up as examples (or counter-examples) of something I’m reading. I’m always sure to take a moment to consider it and write it down in the book.

6) Always make progress.

Life doesn’t always go as hoped or planned. There are times of frustration and stagnancy both personally and professionally in all our lives.  I’ve found one of the best things for me is knowing that no matter what is happening in my life I’m always learning because of what I’m reading. I can always look back and see progress there.

It has also helped that when I’ve had down times, if I read something related to it like a book on happiness or successfully navigating your 20s, I’m actually being proactive about the problem and getting advice from someone great who took the time to research and write a book about the subject.

Remember, this is not a race. The point of reading all these books is to absorb all the ideas and skills shared in the books, not race to the end.

I’ve heard some people like to skim books and think that doing things like reading the opening and closing paragraphs of a chapter and reading headlines in the chapter is enough. They’re either reading the wrong books or missing out on some deep lessons.

As a wise man once said, “Anything worth doing is worth doing well.” It is the journey to 100 books that I both enjoyed and grew tremendously from…not the milestone of specifically 100 that matters to me; I haven’t stopped reading and won’t anytime soon. My Amazon Wishlist is longer than ever (please suggest the best books you’ve read in the comments!) and I can’t wait to learn through more great books for the rest of my life.

12 thoughts on “Why you should read 100 books

  1. Hi Jason,

    Good to see you’re up to great stuff as always.

    Great advice. The two pieces that really resonate with me is 100 books, and write in them.

    Recently I read a few books on the psychology of survival, partly because I live in rural Alaska, and partly for the lessons that translate over to human psychology and business. My favorite two:
    1. Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why by Laurence Gonzales
    2. Adrift by Stephen Callahan

    The greatest take-home lesson: a successful outcome to great challenges is usually the result of deliberately positive perceptions.

  2. Great write-up! A few things that stood out for me:

    Try to find the best books. There are so many books to read, but limited time, so it really is worth making an effort to find the best ones. Like you, I like to get recommendations from people, and I like reading Amazon reviews (the distribution of the positive/negative reviews is at least as important as a single review).

    Write reviews of the books you have read. When you read it with the intention of reviewing it, you automatically think more about what you are reading. Plus, other people benefit from your reviews.

    Write and underline in the books – it definitely helps remembering the content. Like you, I prefer a physical book because it makes the act of underlining and commenting more immediate and personal.

    Also, don’t forget to read fiction. It is enjoyable in itself, and can often bring you new perspectives on things as well.

    Thanks for a well-written blog post.

    • Henrik,

      Thanks for reading and the comment. It’s a good point to occasionally read a little fiction. I find I get my mental breaks and new perspectives from movies, but when I took some time off this summer I read some fiction and it was well worth it as well.

      Thanks,
      Jason

  3. What a great idea. I am going to start on a list right now. I like using Goodreads. So will look there for ideas as well, and of course to make a list. That is one thing I really like about Goodreads is that you can scan the ISBN and save the book in a list for reading later! I like the idea of reading a book that you can utilize what you are learning right away. I think that is the way I will go with this. Again, great post!

    • Valerie,

      Thanks for reading and glad you liked it. GoodReads is definitely an easy way to get started. I decided I wanted all my content on my site, so it made sense to make my own lists.

      Good luck and Happy reading!

      Thanks,
      Jason

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  5. “Not all books are created equal. In fact, most books are pretty terrible, especially business books.” So true!!! I have read so many business books that left me feeling annoyed and unmotivated! I am always looking for inspirational and educational books by successful business owners and entrepreneurs that will give me ideas to grow and maintain my dream business! Amongst the rubbish I came across a fantastic book called “Liber8 Your Business” (http://liber8yourbusiness.com/) by author Laura Humphreys. She is an entrepreneur who has won multiple awards, as well as grown and sold a number of small businesses. It was refreshing to see a different take on the strategies involved in small business growth. Instead of planning ahead and taking a day to day approach to a business strategy, she encourages owners to look at the end goal first and work their design backwards. This book will give you the tools necessary to visualize the final objective and craft a blueprint to get from A to B (or B to A actually!) It’s hard for us business owners to not get bogged down in the daily grind and this book will help you step back and see the big picture. Hope it will help others as it has helped me!

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  8. Looks like we have similar taste in books. I’ve read a lot of the ones on your wishlist and found several to add to my own. One book that I didn’t see on there that I’d highly recommend is Influence by Robert Cialdini.

    My biggest challenge is prioritizing and reading one at a time. I often find myself getting so excited by so many books that I end up being in the middle of 4 or 5 at a time!

    • Andrew,

      Thanks for reading and checking out my list.

      I actually have read Influence. It’s a great one. Thanks for the rec!

      I try to read no more than 2 books at a time. It helps to make sure I finish what I start and can really dive into the content I’m reading.

      If you read any other excellent ones, definitely leave a comment and let me know.

      Thanks,
      Jason

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